Location Lighting with Dedolight LED Fixtures

Old-ENG-Lighting

Not very long ago a cameraman’s standard ENG lighting kit would draw around 7Kw of power.

Cameras and film stocks often required high levels of illumination for the camera to capture decent images.

Lighting today has been redefined due to the development of extremely light sensitive camera sensors, which capture bright images even in dimly illuminated environments. These days, I light purely for aesthetic effect as opposed to lighting mainly for illumination.

Companies like Dedolight have developed LED lighting fixtures which are astoundingly highly efficient compared to old our old lights. In the past, our traditional lamps would generate 90% of their energy in the form of heat and only 10% of the used energy goes to light. These days it’s a different story

Felloni-and-DLED4

 

One example is the Dedolight Felloni 12×12-inch flat panel LED fixture delivers 750W of beautiful soft light and uses just 1/10 the power of a traditional 750W watt lamp.

My typical lighting kit now adds up to around 260Watts instead of 7Kw from years ago; that’s quite a progression in the world of lighting.

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Posted in Dedolight LED, DLED4.1, New Dedolight, Tecpro Felloni, TV Lighting, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Projector Attachment – Dedolight

HD

Cameras are fast changing and it can be difficult to keep up and make the right investments for the future.

But it’s reassuring in these fast-moving times, that my choice of lighting has outlasted several of my cameras.

In the early nineties I bought my first Dedolights and have been hooked on them ever since; they travel with me on every shoot. I’m told that Dedolights are the single best-selling lighting instrument in motion picture and television production.

Dedo-pair

(Above is the 1980’s Classic Tungsten Dedolight and todays Bi-Colour LED Dedolight)

I can talk for ages about Dedolights, but in this post I’ll focus more on the Dedolight projector attachment.

DP1.1

 

In the simplest terms, a projection attachment fits to the front of a Dedolight and has a focusable lens and a slot into which accessories such as Gobos are placed. Gobos being thin metal disks with patterns cut into them.

DP1.1 Gobo

 

Thousands of Gobos exist such as clouds & sky, foliage, abstract and of course the famous venetian blind effect.

Gobos

 

Projection attachments ‘also known as imagers’ are often used to create interesting backgrounds for high-class interviews.

Blind Gobo

 

Throwing the projected gobo image slightly out of focus on the background, adds the illusion of shallow depth of field, which makes the subject separate from the background, making it look more 3D.

Gobo Slide

Iris

 

 

A useful accessory for the projector attachement is the 18-blade adjustable iris. It produces perfect circles which gives a pin point sharp beam.

Geometric shapes of light can also be projected by adjusting framing shutters in the projection attachment.

 

 

Projector attachments aren’t just for backgrounds

Dedo-project-tripod

I sometimes  mount a Dedolight projector onto a tripod fluid head.

As I tilt and pan the head, the projected gobo wraps over and around the product I’m filming. The end result always looks like an expensive visual effect.

 

 

 Precision Projection

Universal

 

The original Dedo projector attachment was released 1984 and was named the ‘Universal’.

It had optics of similar quality to the lenses used on cameras, with no halation, no colour fringing and no distortion. The projector attachment soon became a must have accessory.

 

 

DP1

 

Several years later, the new shape Universal DP1 projector attachment was released and continues to be used with classic tungsten Dedolights and the new DLED.4 lights.

 

DP

Coming right up to date is the DP1.1 with a new double lens system, which gives more light output and even better optical performance.

Although optimised for the new range of focusable LED Dedolights, this new DP1.1 works with all of the older Dedos too.

Like Dedo’s very first projector attachment, the latest DP1.1 has no halation, no colour fringing and no distortion; it’s perfect.

Quick Change Projection Lenses

The Dedo 85mm f/2.8 is the Standard lens that comes with projection attachment kits; it’s a really good all-rounder.

Wide-angle wise, I have a Dedo 60mm f/2.4 lens which allows me to project a slightly bigger image; a real problem solver in tight spaces. This 60mm also has higher light-transmission which is a bonus.

A good range of other lenses like the 135mm and zooms are also available.

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Posted in Dedo LED, Dedolight LED, Dedolight Projector Attachment, DLED4, DLED4.0, DLED4.1, New Dedolight, Projector Attachement | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vintage Lenses on a Modern Camera

Vintage cinema lenses are renowned for producing beautiful images that can’t be simulated in post-production.

Cooke 20-100mm Sony F5

Although colour movies and television had well been well established for years, people would often shoot films in black and white to suggest a period piece. Today’s viewers are several generations past those old black and white days and are much more sophisticated. Presenting a film to them in black and white doesn’t have the same impact, as they grew up in the world of colour. So how can we create an old-timey look, aside from clicking an overused pre-set whilst editing?

Use the vintage lenses that shot the films we grew up watching.

Legendary lenses made by Cooke and Lomo from 35 or 40 ago, helps to bring back the organic look of those seventies and eighties films that we all loved.

These wonderful old cine lenses help ‘de-digitize’ the look and offset the hard edge of modern high-end cameras and are renowned for producing beautiful images that can’t be simulated in post-production, they have personality with gentle painterly softness.

Woody Alan’s ’Midnight in Paris’ has scenes in which a character travels in time to 1920s Paris. Modern Cooke lenses were used to shoot the today shots, whilst old Cooke Panchros helped render a 1920’s feel with warmer and more contrasty images.

Lens choice can be visual shorthand for various emotions.

Even with the tremendous amount of options on the market today for cinema lenses, many cinematographers still stand steadfast by these classic vintage lenses, which are once again very highly sought after.

My vintage lens set includes a Cooke 20-100mm zoom and set of Russian LOMO 35mm cinematography lenses with PL mounts. The set includes 18, 28, 50 & 75mm focal lengths which are creating great interest.

 

Cooke-header

Cooke-2

Countless classic 70’s and 80’s movies were filmed through the Cooke 20-100mm lens pictured above. It cost around $30,000 at the time and was Stanley Kubrick’s favorite zoom lens and was used on many of his films including The Shinning and Eyes Wide Shut. More recent, Spielberg used this model on his 10-part mini-series, “Band of Brothers”.

Cooke lenses are known worldwide for their distinctive ‘Cooke Look’, which has created beautiful images for the movie industry for the past 129 years.

Part of the Cooke Look is the very subtle warmth that’s in the lens, which gives luscious, warm skin tones alongside smooth contrast with a pleasing amount of sharpness.

Cooke 20-100mm Servicing

Above is my Cooke being serviced at visualproducts.com in Ohio prior to shipping.

 

lomo6

Often referred to as Russia’s answer to Cooke lenses, these vintage Lomo primes had been collecting dust on shelves in Belarus for many years before I had them converted to PL mount by camera engineer Les Bosher for use on my Sony F5

lomo5

Lomos are lower contrast with a softer image than modern lenses, which helps render darker and warmer period images with a unique creamy look. Increased lens flare characteristics produce a wonderful nostalgic look whilst a sixteen-leaf iris creates a perfect bokeh.

RussianCam

Lomo cine lenses where made in 1980’s for Kinor 35H movie cameras, which was cutting edge filmmaking technology in the USSR during the cold war and beyond.

These Lomo lenses are no longer manufactured but their magic lives on.

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Bi-colour Dedolight

When I first moved to LED lighting, I have to admit that a few directors I work with seemed very skeptical about LED lighting in television production. Several of them had bad experiences with cameramen who rolled up with those cheap LED lights that eBay are full of. Unfortunately, some well know broadcast suppliers also sell them.

Here are a few reasons not to be tempted by low cost knock-offs.

Colour – No consistency in color between fixtures and a very noticeable shift to magenta; especially when dimmed.

Safety Certification – The majority of these Chinese knock-offs are not CE approved. They do not meet requirements of applicable EC directives. This is a big issue.

I was working on a commercial with a very experienced producer who’s well known for not liking change. From the corner of my eye I saw him marching towards me, waving his hand flamboyantly in the air at Felloni light panel, he spouted “What the f***k is this thing?” Heads turned in the studio as he ranted on until he noticed the Dedo logo on the back of the Feloni. “I’m so sorry Peter, I wasn’t aware it was from Dedolight, splendid, splendid” as he tottered off into the shadows.

It’s amazing just how quickly respect has built towards Dedos new LED fixtures. Two Oscars for services to the motion picture industry probably helps.

Daylight or Bi-Colour? 

I have a colleague who couldn’t decide whether to purchase Daylight or Bi-colour fixtures, so I loaned him a set over a weekend, here are his thoughts.

His older Dedologhts are used mainly on talking heads, so quite rarely at full power. Bearing in mind that the new LED daylight versions are slightly brighter than bi-colour, he decided the convenience of colour temperature change is more important than a slightly brighter lamp. His original Dedolights have been around for 12 years and still perform well. He commented that the new DLED4 build is of similar quality and would probably outlive his cameras.

Bi-colour fixtures cost a little bit more than single colour. He believed the additional cost was justified for the convenience of bi-colour. He has ordered 4 x Bi-colour DLED4 and 2 x Fellonis.

Dedolight DLED4 Bicolour Focusable LED Light

The new DLED4 fixture uses the same-patented aspheric optics as the traditional Dedolight. The LED beam is 12° wider with the evenness of the original Dedolight that we all know.

Dedolight Felloni High Output Bicolor LED Soft Light

The Felloni is a super bright, flicker-free 12 x 12-inch LED Light Panel that produces twice the light of comparable lights and draws just half the current of similar units. Color temperature is variable from 3,200 – 5,600K.

Having used the Dedolight DLED4 and Felloni fixtures on a daily basis for several months now, I can honestly say that these lamps have become my favorites and always travel with me. They are both highly portable and lightweight with excellent colour rendition, which does not change during dimming. Powering with optional V-Lock batteries give me the freedom to light absolutely anywhere.

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SmallHD DP7-PRO-OLED-SX On Camera Monitor

Today, everyone is shooting HD or beyond.

Lenses are one of the most important elements of a camera; they define picture resolution more than the camera sensor. But just as important, is being able to see an accurate, representation of your camera’s true colour gamut and contrast, that’s why I chose the DP7-PRO-OLED-SX monitor by SmallHD.

F5-Small-HD3

I won’t bang on about the image quality, you really have to see it for yourself; it’s superb. I went for the OLED version because I wanted the best high definition, on-camera monitor for my Sony PMW-F5. It’s probably the top 7-inch monitor in its class; my clients love it.

F5-Small-HD

The DP-7 also looks better than any monitor on the market today and seems extremely rugged but weighs in at just over half a kilogram. The menu system is also very intuitive, which is great for reactive style shooting. The proximity sensor switches are a real time-saver too.

Powering options

When used on my Sony F5, I power it from the cameras 12V Hirose. Otherwise, it’s a V-lock PAG, which runs it for ages.

All of the scopes you dream of –  full screen or windowed

  • Waveform monitor
  • Vecterscope
  • RGB Parade
  • Histogram

Anamorphic

When I shoot with Anamorphic lenses, the anamorphic de-squeeze on the DP7 Pro is a lifesaver, because it routes the un-squeezed picture to other monitors on set, for directors and clients.

F5-Small-HD-2

LUTs 

LUT’s enable me to show people what the final ‘look’ will actually look like on set. I can pre load my DP7-pro monitor with custom post-production LUT’s and view them in real time from the camera during playback or recording for everyone who needs to see it. Typical LUT’s can be basic contrast and saturation enhancements, film stock emulation, day for night, etc.

Cross Conversion

The cross conversion feature is handy too. HD-SDI to HDMI or HDMI to HD-SDI. Very useful if you’re feeding mixed monitors.

The DP7-PRO-OLED-SX is packed full of features that other field monitors simply don’t have. I’ve waited a long time for a monitor like this to come along. The DP7 is definitely the solution to a lot of my problems.

I really do believe that SmallHD are in the same league as Steadicam, Panavision and Dedolight; all unique innovators who produced equipment that really made a difference.

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Dedolight produce a whole range of cutting-edge LED lighting fixtures and I’ve been using their DLED4 lights for some time now; they are amazing.

I guess everyone is asking ‘what’s the difference between the new DLED4 LED and the classic DLH4 head.

DLED2

The new DLED4 LED fixture comes in 3 types; Daylight, Tungsten or Bi-Colour. The DLED4  uses the patented Dedo aspheric optics that delivers the amazing 1:20 flood to spot ratio that we are all used to in the traditional DLH4. The  lamp beam is 12° wider than the original 48° dedo head which is a real bonus. The evenness of the beam is just as clean as the older dedolight and has excellent colour rendition which doesn’t change during dimming.

The DLED4 daylight match really well with KinoFlo, HMI, Felloni and are compatible with standard Dedo accessories.

dedo3

The DLED4 is extremely cool running and the dimmable ballast is slightly smaller than the original Dedo in-line transformer.

The new LED Dedolight has

  • All of the greatness of the original Dedolight
  • A wider beam than the original
  • Excellent colour rendition
  • Maintains colour temperature when dimmed
  • Can be powered by ‘world mains’ voltages or battery
  • Has very cool operation

It’s absolutely perfect!

 

Dedolight DLED9.1

I was asked by a reader to do comparison test of the Dedolight DLED focusable lamps.
There is a 2-stop difference between the DLED4 and the DLED9 which makes the DLED9 almost 4 times brighter than the DLED4.

There is a 2-stop difference between the DLED9 and a 1K Arri fresnel with full CT blue. The heat output from the front of the Arri is substantial, but on the other hand the Dedolight DLED9 delivers an amazing heat free zone in front of it’s lens.

DLED9-Arri-1K

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Sony PMW-F5 Super35 Cinema Camera

F5 Pete Burns Shoot HD, 2K or 4K with the Sony F5

The F5 delivers a shallow depth of field that we’ve all seen in the cinemas for many years, the foreground is in focus the background is immediately out of focus; it’s a very pleasing look. With an impressive fourteen stops of latitude, the whole picture to be reproduced in a very natural way with lots of details in the dark area of the screen with great highlight handling. And if your final delivery requirement is standard HD, then the camera can be switched to HD, but that 4K sensor still provides spectacular super-sampled pictures with visibly superior texture, colour reproduction and detail that ordinary HD cameras cannot touch.

  • Shoots HD, 2K or 4K
  • 14 stops of latitude approaches that of traditional motion picture film
  • Extraordinary low-light sensitivity with a base rate of ISO 2000
  • Extremely low noise in the blacks
  • Continuous high speed shooting at up to 180fps; 7 times slower than real life
  • Time-lapse interval recording starting at 1 frame per second
  • PL Lens mount

 

PL Cine Lenses

cp2set

I decided very early on to invest in PL mount cine lenses as they don’t have the problems that photographic still lenses have, i.e. vignetting, inconsistent focus during zoom, non-colour matched, etc. Cine Lenses are designed and built for use on a motion picture camera, photo lenses are built for shooting still images only.

Cine lenses are generally much higher in resolution than still camera lenses. You don’t enlarge a still photo anywhere as much as you do a movie frame
A still lens needs to take photo that can be enlarged to maybe a 16×20 inch print. A cine lens has to capture frames that may be projected onto a 30×20 foot screen.
That’s why “top quality” cine lenses normally exceed the resolution of the camera sensor.

PL mount cine lenses are a big investment but I believe they will out last the cameras I own in the future.

Different moods need different glass

Lens front

I have a comprehensive line-up of cine lenses that help create different looks and moods in a scene. The optical characteristics of a lens add more to the look of a film than you would imagine.

Cooke MiniS4 Primes are renowned for producing beautiful images that can’t be simulated in post-production; they just make people look great.

Cooke Zooms have been used to shoot countless classic movies. These lenses tend to be more saturated resulting in a “Kodacolor” film look. Many romantic comedies have been shot with Cooke zooms.

Lomo Primes are lower contrast with a softer image than modern lenses, which helps render darker and warmer period images with that unique creamy look. They are great for warm close ups and flashbacks. Uncoated elements add increased flare rendering for a pleasing nostalgic look.

Cooke lenses are my favourite

Cooke-S4i 

UK based Cooke Optics in Leicester received the iconic gold Oscar in 2014 for contribution to the film industry. Technical Oscars are very rare and include; Steadicam in 1978 and Dedolioght in 1990. Cooke lenses have brought viewers hundreds of classic movies and TV, from Star Wars to Some Like it Hot, Breaking Bad and Downton Abbey.

The ‘Cooke Look’ has been a treasured feature of Cooke lenses for more than a century. Part of the Cooke Look is the very subtle warmth that’s in the lens, which gives luscious, warm skin tones alongside smooth contrast with a pleasing amount of sharpness. Another part of the ‘Cooke Look’ is the fall off of the focus. At a given focal point, the image will be perfectly sharp, but beyond and in front will have a nice soft fall off of the amount of sharpness of the image. Non-Cooke lenses tend to have a pretty sharp fall off which isn’t as nice as the. Cooke cine lenses are individually handcrafted which is one of the reasons these lenses carry such high prestige and price.

Classic Glass on a Modern Camera

Cooke 20-100mm F5 Even with the tremendous amount of options on the market today for cinema lenses, many cinematographers still stand steadfast by classic lenses like the Cooke 20-100mm zoom above.

The optics of older glass in this Cooke helps greatly in offsetting the hard edge of the new breed of high-end cameras like Sony F5, Alexa, etc. Cooke lenses are known worldwide for their distinctive ‘Cooke Look’, which has created beautiful images for the movie industry for the past 129 years.

Countless classic 70’s and 80’s movies were filmed through the Cooke 20-100mm lens, which cost around $30,000 at the time. It was Stanley Kubrick’s favourite zoom lens, and was used on many of his films including The Shinning and Eyes Wide Shut. More recent, Spielberg used this model on his 10-part mini-series, “Band of Brothers”.

My lens set

Cooke Mini S4 T2.8 Primes

Cooke Mini S4 primes have superb optical performance and exceptional control of flare. Delivering the distinctive ‘Cooke Look’, the 32mm is a good all-rounder whilst a 65mm makes people look amazing. The Cooke look is more like what your eyes see, it isn’t crystal sharpness like the many other lenses.

Cooke 20-100mm T3.1 Cine Zoom

This classic zoom lens also has the ‘Cooke Look’, which has been a treasured feature of Cooke lenses for more than a century. Images tend to be more saturated and slightly warmer, resulting in a “Kodacolor” look.
T3.1 lens with a focal length range of 20-100mm with a close focus from lens front of 13″ (11 lbs/5kg)

RED 18-50mm T2.9 Cine Zoom

A very usable lens for hand-held shooting that requires reactive framing. The 18mm end gives good wides whilst the 35-50mm range delivers reasonable out of focus backgrounds when required. Cine-mod allegedly by Cooke Optics.
T2.9 lens with a focal length range of 18-50mm with a close focus from lens front of just 2-inches.

GL Optics 11-16mm T3 Ultra Wide-Angle Cine Zoom

With an angle of view which is wider than human vision, this lens delivers memorable super wide angle shots that other lenses just can’t do. A superb lens for architecture, confined spaces or just amazing perspectives. GL Optics Cine-mod the very popular Tokina 11-16mm MkII lens from front to back. There is nothing left of the original Tokina base lens with the exception of the lens elements. GL adds manual iris and a new alloy cine-style PL housing with smooth control of focus and zoom. It’s also parfocal with a close focus distance of 12-inches.

Lomo Primes  18mm, 28mm,  50mm,  75mm

Often referred to as Russia’s answer to Cooke lenses, these classic Lomos had been collecting dust on shelves in Belarus for many years before I had them converted to PL mounts. Lomos are lower contrast with a softer image than modern lenses, which helps render darker and warmer period images with a unique creamy look. Increased lens flare characteristics produce a wonderful nostalgic look whilst a sixteen-leaf iris creates a perfect bokeh. These lenses where made for Konvas S35mm movie cameras, which was cutting edge filmmaking technology in the USSR during the cold war and beyond. Lomo lenses are no longer manufactured and may not be technically as sharp as modern lenses, but they have the magic.

Macro Prime 100mm f/2.8

Tokina 100mm  AT-XPro for filming extreme close-ups of objects. Maximum reproduction ratio of 1:1 An audience can appreciate for the first time, the delicate complexity of everyday items. Even printed words and maps take on new importance when we can see the very texture of the paper or the indentations of each letter produced by a typewriter. Macro filming brings your audience’s focus into places their eyes normally don’t go.

Supporting my F5

oconnor2Oconnor’s ultimate 1030D fluid heads are known for their ultra smooth feel, fluid movement and great balance. Chad O’Connor sold his first fluid heads to Walt Disney in 1949, today they have become industry standard in Hollywood.

My choice of follow focus is the O’Connor O-Focus Cine, which is double sided so it can be operated from either side of the camera.

Matte Box wise, I use an O’Connor O-Box which; it’s rock solid.

Your workflow

Shot material is transferred via my MacBook Pro to your portable hard drives. The media is edit suite friendly and compatible with up to date Avid, Final Cut Pro, Premere, etc.

A full kit list can be viewed at my website www.peteburns.com

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